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A Tory MP has been detained on charges of sexual misconduct spanning seven years. On Twitter, fans believe he is Mark Francois.

One of the Conservative Party’s MPs has been arrested by the Metropolitan Police. He is not permitted to enter the parliament until the investigation is completed.

The Conservative MP was detained for indecent assault, sexual assault, rape, misuse of a position of trust, and misconduct in a public office, according to British news outlets.

Who is the Tory MP accused Twitter?

According to Twitter, the Conservative MP arrested is Mark Francois.

People began speculating about the unknown MP within a few minutes after the news surfaced. It appears that social media has deduced that the MP for Rayleigh and Wickford is the culprit.

Until now, the official news organization has remained anonymous. The Metropolitan Police have been wise not to reveal the name for the time being, but the information will eventually get out.

According to the Metropolitan Police, the alleged MP is currently in jail and an investigation is underway.

https://twitter.com/streboria/status/1526613824329207812?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1526613824329207812%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fontrend.news%2Fwho-is-karen-thomas-mark-francois-allegedly-arrested-twitter-names-tory-mp

Mark Francois Wife Karen Thomas: Are They Together? Sexual Assault Rumors

Karen Thomas, Mark Francois’s wife, had previously divorced him.

They divorced in 2006, according to the politician’s Wikipedia bio. Between 2002 and 2009, the claimed sexual assault was meant to have occurred. As a result, internet users are speculating that the assault was the cause of their split.

The couple had been married for six years, having married in 2000. After the divorce, Francois did not remarry.

According to the Metropolitan Police, the alleged MP is currently in jail and an investigation is underway.

Assault Charges And Mugshot: What Did Mark Francois Do?

Mark Francois is being held on suspicion of sexual assault.

He has been charged with indecent assault, sexual assault, rape, abuse of a position of trust, and misconduct in a public office, according to Met Police. Furthermore, the charges surfaced in January 2020. The Metropolitan Police launched an investigation that lasted over two years before making an arrest.

Furthermore, the Tory Party has temporarily barred the MP from the House of Commons.

There currently no information about the family of Alex Davies, founder of neo-Nazi group.

Alex Davies, founder of neo-Nazi group found guilty of terrorism offences

A former philosophy undergraduate was convicted guilty of terrorist charges after founding an infamous neo-Nazi group that penetrated the police and army.

The prosecution referred to Alex Davies as a “extremist’s extremist” who had a unique place in history as the founder of two different far-right organizations that were both banned under terrorism legislation.

He is the last of 25 members of the neo-Nazi group National Action to face prison after being found guilty of keeping the group going after it was banned for advocating the murder of MPs.

When he created a new far-right club focused at recruiting students and young people to the neo-Nazi cause, Davies was characterized by prosecutors as a “innocent-looking, educated, and brilliant” student at Warwick University.

He began spreading neo-Nazi “memes” and staging stunts and demonstrations using the internet and social media as a former UKIP campaigner and member of the BNP youth wing.

The gang was believed to have militaristic goals, focusing on boxing, martial arts, and knife fighting.

Knives, daggers, machetes, high-velocity crossbows, rifles, pump-action shotguns, knuckle dusters, CS spray, baseball bats, and even a longbow were among the items collected by members.

National Action described itself as a “white jihadist” group and a “throwback to the 1930s, dedicated to all-out race war”, Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said.

“It advocated the same Nazi aims and ideals – the ethnic cleansing of anyone who did not fit the Aryan Nazi mould: Jews, Muslims, people of colour, people of Asian descent, people of gay orientation, and anyone remotely liberal,” Mr Jameson said.

When Jo Cox was assassinated in June 2016, the group openly praised her death and voiced support for her assassin.

As they traversed the country performing “flash demonstrations” and parading banners with the phrase “Hitler was right,” National Action encouraged followers to join the police and army.

Jack Renshaw, who was imprisoned for plotting to assassinate MP Rosie Cooper with a sword, Mikko Vehvilainen, a serving soldier who was stockpiling weapons, and Ben Hannam, who joined the Metropolitan Police, were among the group’s members.

Jack Coulson built a pipe bomb and threatened to expel Muslims from Bradford by posting an image of the city’s skyline on social media.

Alice Cutter, dubbed the Buchenwald Princess in a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant, was one of the other recruits.

Davies’ propaganda campaign was aided by another student, Ben Raymond, who was studying politics at Essex University, and Mark Jones, a former BNP member, who together established a design studio for the party.

There currently no information about the parents of Alex Davies, the founder of neo-Nazi group.

Alex Davies, founder of neo-Nazi group found guilty of terrorism offences

A former philosophy undergraduate was convicted guilty of terrorist charges after founding an infamous neo-Nazi group that penetrated the police and army.

The prosecution referred to Alex Davies as a “extremist’s extremist” who had a unique place in history as the founder of two different far-right organizations that were both banned under terrorism legislation.

He is the last of 25 members of the neo-Nazi group National Action to face prison after being found guilty of keeping the group going after it was banned for advocating the murder of MPs.

When he created a new far-right club focused at recruiting students and young people to the neo-Nazi cause, Davies was characterized by prosecutors as a “innocent-looking, educated, and brilliant” student at Warwick University.

He began spreading neo-Nazi “memes” and staging stunts and demonstrations using the internet and social media as a former UKIP campaigner and member of the BNP youth wing.

The gang was believed to have militaristic goals, focusing on boxing, martial arts, and knife fighting.

Knives, daggers, machetes, high-velocity crossbows, rifles, pump-action shotguns, knuckle dusters, CS spray, baseball bats, and even a longbow were among the items collected by members.

National Action described itself as a “white jihadist” group and a “throwback to the 1930s, dedicated to all-out race war”, Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said.

“It advocated the same Nazi aims and ideals – the ethnic cleansing of anyone who did not fit the Aryan Nazi mould: Jews, Muslims, people of colour, people of Asian descent, people of gay orientation, and anyone remotely liberal,” Mr Jameson said.

When Jo Cox was assassinated in June 2016, the group openly praised her death and voiced support for her assassin.

As they traversed the country performing “flash demonstrations” and parading banners with the phrase “Hitler was right,” National Action encouraged followers to join the police and army.

Jack Renshaw, who was imprisoned for plotting to assassinate MP Rosie Cooper with a sword, Mikko Vehvilainen, a serving soldier who was stockpiling weapons, and Ben Hannam, who joined the Metropolitan Police, were among the group’s members.

Jack Coulson built a pipe bomb and threatened to expel Muslims from Bradford by posting an image of the city’s skyline on social media.

Alice Cutter, dubbed the Buchenwald Princess in a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant, was one of the other recruits.

Davies’ propaganda campaign was aided by another student, Ben Raymond, who was studying politics at Essex University, and Mark Jones, a former BNP member, who together established a design studio for the party.

There currently no information about the wife of Alex Davies, founder of neo-Nazi group.

Alex Davies, founder of neo-Nazi group found guilty of terrorism offences

A former philosophy undergraduate was convicted guilty of terrorist charges after founding an infamous neo-Nazi group that penetrated the police and army.

The prosecution referred to Alex Davies as a “extremist’s extremist” who had a unique place in history as the founder of two different far-right organizations that were both banned under terrorism legislation.

He is the last of 25 members of the neo-Nazi group National Action to face prison after being found guilty of keeping the group going after it was banned for advocating the murder of MPs.

When he created a new far-right club focused at recruiting students and young people to the neo-Nazi cause, Davies was characterized by prosecutors as a “innocent-looking, educated, and brilliant” student at Warwick University.

He began spreading neo-Nazi “memes” and staging stunts and demonstrations using the internet and social media as a former UKIP campaigner and member of the BNP youth wing.

The gang was believed to have militaristic goals, focusing on boxing, martial arts, and knife fighting.

Knives, daggers, machetes, high-velocity crossbows, rifles, pump-action shotguns, knuckle dusters, CS spray, baseball bats, and even a longbow were among the items collected by members.

National Action described itself as a “white jihadist” group and a “throwback to the 1930s, dedicated to all-out race war”, Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said.

“It advocated the same Nazi aims and ideals – the ethnic cleansing of anyone who did not fit the Aryan Nazi mould: Jews, Muslims, people of colour, people of Asian descent, people of gay orientation, and anyone remotely liberal,” Mr Jameson said.

When Jo Cox was assassinated in June 2016, the group openly praised her death and voiced support for her assassin.

As they traversed the country performing “flash demonstrations” and parading banners with the phrase “Hitler was right,” National Action encouraged followers to join the police and army.

Jack Renshaw, who was imprisoned for plotting to assassinate MP Rosie Cooper with a sword, Mikko Vehvilainen, a serving soldier who was stockpiling weapons, and Ben Hannam, who joined the Metropolitan Police, were among the group’s members.

Jack Coulson built a pipe bomb and threatened to expel Muslims from Bradford by posting an image of the city’s skyline on social media.

Alice Cutter, dubbed the Buchenwald Princess in a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant, was one of the other recruits.

Davies’ propaganda campaign was aided by another student, Ben Raymond, who was studying politics at Essex University, and Mark Jones, a former BNP member, who together established a design studio for the party.

A former philosophy undergraduate was convicted guilty of terrorist charges after founding an infamous neo-Nazi group that penetrated the police and army.

The prosecution referred to Alex Davies as a “extremist’s extremist” who had a unique place in history as the founder of two different far-right organizations that were both banned under terrorism legislation.

He is the last of 25 members of the neo-Nazi group National Action to face prison after being found guilty of keeping the group going after it was banned for advocating the murder of MPs.

When he created a new far-right club focused at recruiting students and young people to the neo-Nazi cause, Davies was characterized by prosecutors as a “innocent-looking, educated, and brilliant” student at Warwick University.

He began spreading neo-Nazi “memes” and staging stunts and demonstrations using the internet and social media as a former UKIP campaigner and member of the BNP youth wing.

The gang was believed to have militaristic goals, focusing on boxing, martial arts, and knife fighting.

Knives, daggers, machetes, high-velocity crossbows, rifles, pump-action shotguns, knuckle dusters, CS spray, baseball bats, and even a longbow were among the items collected by members.

National Action described itself as a “white jihadist” group and a “throwback to the 1930s, dedicated to all-out race war”, Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said.

“It advocated the same Nazi aims and ideals – the ethnic cleansing of anyone who did not fit the Aryan Nazi mould: Jews, Muslims, people of colour, people of Asian descent, people of gay orientation, and anyone remotely liberal,” Mr Jameson said.

When Jo Cox was assassinated in June 2016, the group openly praised her death and voiced support for her assassin.

As they traversed the country performing “flash demonstrations” and parading banners with the phrase “Hitler was right,” National Action encouraged followers to join the police and army.

Jack Renshaw, who was imprisoned for plotting to assassinate MP Rosie Cooper with a sword, Mikko Vehvilainen, a serving soldier who was stockpiling weapons, and Ben Hannam, who joined the Metropolitan Police, were among the group’s members.

Jack Coulson built a pipe bomb and threatened to expel Muslims from Bradford by posting an image of the city’s skyline on social media.

Alice Cutter, dubbed the Buchenwald Princess in a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant, was one of the other recruits.

Davies’ propaganda campaign was aided by another student, Ben Raymond, who was studying politics at Essex University, and Mark Jones, a former BNP member, who together established a design studio for the party.

Eloi Rolland, a missing French teenager, told his family he planned to bring them to New Zealand.



His parents, Thierry and Catherine Rolland, have finally arrived, more than two years after he vanished.



They have no idea what happened to their son and are desperate for information.

“We are so sad,” Catherine said.

Eloi last contacted the couple, who live in Montpellier, France, on March 4, 2020, when he asked his mother what she would like him to bring her as a gift from New Zealand.

Eloi Rolland found?
Parents of missing French teen Eloi Rolland search for answers in New Zealand

“I told him I would like some sand … and some jewellery with shell.”

Catherine suggested Eloi get some sand from beneath the Auckland Harbour Bridge, which he routinely crossed from his host family’s house in Birkenhead to the city.

“But he said it’s not a nice sand,” she recalled.

Eloi, who was 18 at the time, wanted to bring his mother some “beautiful” sand from famed Piha Beach, but it’s unclear whether he ever made it there.

Eloi rode a train from Britomart to New Lynn early on March 7, 2020, after leaving his host family’s house the night before. On CCTV, he was last seen heading down Fruitvale Rd around 7.26 a.m., and his cellphone later located him around the Piha Rd and Scenic Drive intersection at 9.18 a.m.

The question of where Eloi went beyond that is one that detectives have spent many hours attempting to answer.

Despite worries from his previous manager that he was distressed, nothing seemed awry before his disappearance, according to his family.

Eloi’s social media portrays a young man having arrived in New Zealand to learn English in September 2019 and loving and discovering a new nation while meeting new acquaintances.

When asked why Eloi chose New Zealand, Catherine stated he was interested in learning about its culture and landscape, as well as nature. He was also a certified sailing instructor and water rescue expert.

His ultimate goal was to “master” the English language before enrolling at the Universite de Toulouse III to study engineering.

Eloi’s family first became concerned when he did not contact his sister, Aurore, for three days. Catherine thought it was weird because the two spoke frequently.

Detective senior sergeant Callum McNeill told Stuff in April 2020 that the longer Eloi was gone, the less likely police were to discover him alive.

Thierry and Catherine, on the other hand, refused to believe their son was dead.

The pair arrived in New Zealand on May 9, after a trip that had been delayed owing to Covid-19 border restrictions. A group of French filmmakers accompanied them, working on a documentary series on Eloi’s life before and throughout his time in New Zealand.

“Many people are here for him, and we hope that he gives us a sign,” Catherine said.

The pair has subsequently met with police, who took them on a helicopter ride over the Waitkere Ranges, which they claim helped them better comprehend where Eloi went missing.

The density of the Waitkere Ranges, on the other hand, made them wonder that Eloi had gone in there at all. On Piha Rd near where Eloi’s cellphone last pinged, there were no paths into the jungle, and Thierry claimed it appeared “impossible” to merely go into and through a solid wall of foliage.

Eloi being hit by a car is another possibility. His parents, on the other hand, couldn’t believe no one had seen it.

“We don’t know what’s happened,” Catherine said.

“We realise he is perhaps in another place.”

But the pair clung to the faith that Eloi was still alive and well, promising to be there for him at all times.

“I hope he’s happy, surrounded by good people and has learned a lot.”

They were grateful to the police for the time and effort put into the investigation, as well as the support they had got from Kiwis, including Eloi’s friends, one of whom messaged to say their son light up whatever room he entered.

“It’s so important for us,” Catherine said. Thierry added: “It is very nice.”

When asked if the event had tainted their opinion of New Zealand, Thierry and Catherine stated it was still “a fantastic place” and that they hoped Kiwis would continue to search for Eloi.

“We hope to come back to New Zealand,” Catherine said.

“Eloi is here. He is our son.”

On Friday’s episode of Tipping Point, Ben Shephard was joined by four new aspiring quizzers, all of whom were hoping to walk away with some substantial cash. However, only one contestant could go to the final, and today it was Margaret’s chance. Margaret died tragically shortly after filming and before the episode aired, prompting the ITV show and host Ben to pay tribute to her.

Margaret Tipping Point cause of death reddit (video)

Margaret made Ben laugh the entire time she was on Tipping Point, and she dazzled him with her quizzing expertise to make it to the end.

Unfortunately, the ITV quiz show competitor did not win the £10,000 prize, but she did win £2,650, which she planned to spend on a trip to India.

Margaret had an unique spa break as well after winning the mystery reward award.
Margaret passed away shortly after the episode was recorded in 2019, and both the show’s official Twitter account and Ben paid respect to her after communicating with her family.

The show’s official Twitter account broke the news prior to Friday’s episode airing.
It tweeted: “After the recording of today’s programme, we spoke with Margaret’s family who shared the tragic news of her passing. 


“Everyone at Tipping Point would like to extend their sincerest sympathies. #TippingPoint.”
Ben similarly took to his Twitter page to pay tribute to Margaret sharing a snap of him alongside the episode’s contestants.

“This was such a lovely show,” the Good Morning Britain star began.
“And Margaret was a very special and worthy winner. We were so sorry to hear of her passing, 

“But her family were keen that her episode was shown and enjoyed. 
“I just want to send all my love and thoughts to her husband Paul and her family.”

Echoing Ben and Tipping Point’s words, hundreds of ITV viewers similarly took to social media to share their condolences to Margaret’s family.

Replying to Ben’s tweet, one fan tweeted: “Ben you can see she really enjoyed herself on the show. 

“Margaret was very lucky each time she dropped the coins down I kept thinking they would be a rider but she had luck on her side. Love her.”

A second agreed: “So sad just watched the program she was a lovely contestant condolence to her family.”

“Watched it today, so sad, she was lovely, you always look like you are genuinely happy for people when they win, love it,” said a third.
A fourth concurred: “Such a great show shouting at the TV hoping the counters would drop behind the Jackpot, 

“So glad Margaret took the money such a wise decision, my thoughts are with Margaret’s family.”

And a fifth weighed in: “What a lovely lady Margaret was. I hope she got her trip to India and enjoyed the spa break won. RIP Margaret xx.”

Margaret Tipping Point’s cause of death has not been revealed by her family yet.

Eloi Rolland, a missing French teenager, told his family he planned to bring them to New Zealand.



His parents, Thierry and Catherine Rolland, have finally arrived, more than two years after he vanished.



They have no idea what happened to their son and are desperate for information.

“We are so sad,” Catherine said.

Eloi last contacted the couple, who live in Montpellier, France, on March 4, 2020, when he asked his mother what she would like him to bring her as a gift from New Zealand.

Parents of missing French teen Eloi Rolland search for answers in New Zealand
Parents of missing French teen Eloi Rolland search for answers in New Zealand

“I told him I would like some sand … and some jewellery with shell.”

Catherine suggested Eloi get some sand from beneath the Auckland Harbour Bridge, which he routinely crossed from his host family’s house in Birkenhead to the city.

“But he said it’s not a nice sand,” she recalled.

Eloi, who was 18 at the time, wanted to bring his mother some “beautiful” sand from famed Piha Beach, but it’s unclear whether he ever made it there.

Eloi rode a train from Britomart to New Lynn early on March 7, 2020, after leaving his host family’s house the night before. On CCTV, he was last seen heading down Fruitvale Rd around 7.26 a.m., and his cellphone later located him around the Piha Rd and Scenic Drive intersection at 9.18 a.m.

The question of where Eloi went beyond that is one that detectives have spent many hours attempting to answer.

Despite worries from his previous manager that he was distressed, nothing seemed awry before his disappearance, according to his family.

Eloi’s social media portrays a young man having arrived in New Zealand to learn English in September 2019 and loving and discovering a new nation while meeting new acquaintances.

When asked why Eloi chose New Zealand, Catherine stated he was interested in learning about its culture and landscape, as well as nature. He was also a certified sailing instructor and water rescue expert.

His ultimate goal was to “master” the English language before enrolling at the Universite de Toulouse III to study engineering.

Eloi’s family first became concerned when he did not contact his sister, Aurore, for three days. Catherine thought it was weird because the two spoke frequently.

Detective senior sergeant Callum McNeill told Stuff in April 2020 that the longer Eloi was gone, the less likely police were to discover him alive.

Thierry and Catherine, on the other hand, refused to believe their son was dead.

The pair arrived in New Zealand on May 9, after a trip that had been delayed owing to Covid-19 border restrictions. A group of French filmmakers accompanied them, working on a documentary series on Eloi’s life before and throughout his time in New Zealand.

“Many people are here for him, and we hope that he gives us a sign,” Catherine said.

The pair has subsequently met with police, who took them on a helicopter ride over the Waitkere Ranges, which they claim helped them better comprehend where Eloi went missing.

The density of the Waitkere Ranges, on the other hand, made them wonder that Eloi had gone in there at all. On Piha Rd near where Eloi’s cellphone last pinged, there were no paths into the jungle, and Thierry claimed it appeared “impossible” to merely go into and through a solid wall of foliage.

Eloi being hit by a car is another possibility. His parents, on the other hand, couldn’t believe no one had seen it.

“We don’t know what’s happened,” Catherine said.

“We realise he is perhaps in another place.”

But the pair clung to the faith that Eloi was still alive and well, promising to be there for him at all times.

“I hope he’s happy, surrounded by good people and has learned a lot.”

They were grateful to the police for the time and effort put into the investigation, as well as the support they had got from Kiwis, including Eloi’s friends, one of whom messaged to say their son light up whatever room he entered.

“It’s so important for us,” Catherine said. Thierry added: “It is very nice.”

When asked if the event had tainted their opinion of New Zealand, Thierry and Catherine stated it was still “a fantastic place” and that they hoped Kiwis would continue to search for Eloi.

“We hope to come back to New Zealand,” Catherine said.

“Eloi is here. He is our son.”

Eloi Rolland, a missing French teenager, told his family he planned to bring them to New Zealand.



His parents, Thierry and Catherine Rolland, have finally arrived, more than two years after he vanished.



They have no idea what happened to their son and are desperate for information.

“We are so sad,” Catherine said.

Eloi last contacted the couple, who live in Montpellier, France, on March 4, 2020, when he asked his mother what she would like him to bring her as a gift from New Zealand.

Eloi Rolland reddit
Parents of missing French teen Eloi Rolland search for answers in New Zealand

“I told him I would like some sand … and some jewellery with shell.”

Catherine suggested Eloi get some sand from beneath the Auckland Harbour Bridge, which he routinely crossed from his host family’s house in Birkenhead to the city.

“But he said it’s not a nice sand,” she recalled.

Eloi, who was 18 at the time, wanted to bring his mother some “beautiful” sand from famed Piha Beach, but it’s unclear whether he ever made it there.

Eloi rode a train from Britomart to New Lynn early on March 7, 2020, after leaving his host family’s house the night before. On CCTV, he was last seen heading down Fruitvale Rd around 7.26 a.m., and his cellphone later located him around the Piha Rd and Scenic Drive intersection at 9.18 a.m.

The question of where Eloi went beyond that is one that detectives have spent many hours attempting to answer.

Despite worries from his previous manager that he was distressed, nothing seemed awry before his disappearance, according to his family.

Eloi’s social media portrays a young man having arrived in New Zealand to learn English in September 2019 and loving and discovering a new nation while meeting new acquaintances.

When asked why Eloi chose New Zealand, Catherine stated he was interested in learning about its culture and landscape, as well as nature. He was also a certified sailing instructor and water rescue expert.

His ultimate goal was to “master” the English language before enrolling at the Universite de Toulouse III to study engineering.

Eloi’s family first became concerned when he did not contact his sister, Aurore, for three days. Catherine thought it was weird because the two spoke frequently.

Detective senior sergeant Callum McNeill told Stuff in April 2020 that the longer Eloi was gone, the less likely police were to discover him alive.

Thierry and Catherine, on the other hand, refused to believe their son was dead.

The pair arrived in New Zealand on May 9, after a trip that had been delayed owing to Covid-19 border restrictions. A group of French filmmakers accompanied them, working on a documentary series on Eloi’s life before and throughout his time in New Zealand.

“Many people are here for him, and we hope that he gives us a sign,” Catherine said.

The pair has subsequently met with police, who took them on a helicopter ride over the Waitkere Ranges, which they claim helped them better comprehend where Eloi went missing.

The density of the Waitkere Ranges, on the other hand, made them wonder that Eloi had gone in there at all. On Piha Rd near where Eloi’s cellphone last pinged, there were no paths into the jungle, and Thierry claimed it appeared “impossible” to merely go into and through a solid wall of foliage.

Eloi being hit by a car is another possibility. His parents, on the other hand, couldn’t believe no one had seen it.

“We don’t know what’s happened,” Catherine said.

“We realise he is perhaps in another place.”

But the pair clung to the faith that Eloi was still alive and well, promising to be there for him at all times.

“I hope he’s happy, surrounded by good people and has learned a lot.”

They were grateful to the police for the time and effort put into the investigation, as well as the support they had got from Kiwis, including Eloi’s friends, one of whom messaged to say their son light up whatever room he entered.

“It’s so important for us,” Catherine said. Thierry added: “It is very nice.”

When asked if the event had tainted their opinion of New Zealand, Thierry and Catherine stated it was still “a fantastic place” and that they hoped Kiwis would continue to search for Eloi.

“We hope to come back to New Zealand,” Catherine said.

“Eloi is here. He is our son.”

Eloi Rolland, a missing French teenager, told his family he planned to bring them to New Zealand.



His parents, Thierry and Catherine Rolland, have finally arrived, more than two years after he vanished.



They have no idea what happened to their son and are desperate for information.

“We are so sad,” Catherine said.

Eloi last contacted the couple, who live in Montpellier, France, on March 4, 2020, when he asked his mother what she would like him to bring her as a gift from New Zealand.

Eloi Rolland NZ
Parents of missing French teen Eloi Rolland search for answers in New Zealand

“I told him I would like some sand … and some jewellery with shell.”

Catherine suggested Eloi get some sand from beneath the Auckland Harbour Bridge, which he routinely crossed from his host family’s house in Birkenhead to the city.

“But he said it’s not a nice sand,” she recalled.

Eloi, who was 18 at the time, wanted to bring his mother some “beautiful” sand from famed Piha Beach, but it’s unclear whether he ever made it there.

Eloi rode a train from Britomart to New Lynn early on March 7, 2020, after leaving his host family’s house the night before. On CCTV, he was last seen heading down Fruitvale Rd around 7.26 a.m., and his cellphone later located him around the Piha Rd and Scenic Drive intersection at 9.18 a.m.

The question of where Eloi went beyond that is one that detectives have spent many hours attempting to answer.

Despite worries from his previous manager that he was distressed, nothing seemed awry before his disappearance, according to his family.

Eloi’s social media portrays a young man having arrived in New Zealand to learn English in September 2019 and loving and discovering a new nation while meeting new acquaintances.

When asked why Eloi chose New Zealand, Catherine stated he was interested in learning about its culture and landscape, as well as nature. He was also a certified sailing instructor and water rescue expert.

His ultimate goal was to “master” the English language before enrolling at the Universite de Toulouse III to study engineering.

Eloi’s family first became concerned when he did not contact his sister, Aurore, for three days. Catherine thought it was weird because the two spoke frequently.

Detective senior sergeant Callum McNeill told Stuff in April 2020 that the longer Eloi was gone, the less likely police were to discover him alive.

Thierry and Catherine, on the other hand, refused to believe their son was dead.

The pair arrived in New Zealand on May 9, after a trip that had been delayed owing to Covid-19 border restrictions. A group of French filmmakers accompanied them, working on a documentary series on Eloi’s life before and throughout his time in New Zealand.

“Many people are here for him, and we hope that he gives us a sign,” Catherine said.

The pair has subsequently met with police, who took them on a helicopter ride over the Waitkere Ranges, which they claim helped them better comprehend where Eloi went missing.

The density of the Waitkere Ranges, on the other hand, made them wonder that Eloi had gone in there at all. On Piha Rd near where Eloi’s cellphone last pinged, there were no paths into the jungle, and Thierry claimed it appeared “impossible” to merely go into and through a solid wall of foliage.

Eloi being hit by a car is another possibility. His parents, on the other hand, couldn’t believe no one had seen it.

“We don’t know what’s happened,” Catherine said.

“We realise he is perhaps in another place.”

But the pair clung to the faith that Eloi was still alive and well, promising to be there for him at all times.

“I hope he’s happy, surrounded by good people and has learned a lot.”

They were grateful to the police for the time and effort put into the investigation, as well as the support they had got from Kiwis, including Eloi’s friends, one of whom messaged to say their son light up whatever room he entered.

“It’s so important for us,” Catherine said. Thierry added: “It is very nice.”

When asked if the event had tainted their opinion of New Zealand, Thierry and Catherine stated it was still “a fantastic place” and that they hoped Kiwis would continue to search for Eloi.

“We hope to come back to New Zealand,” Catherine said.

“Eloi is here. He is our son.”